23 Quotes from The Girl on the Train book by Paula Hawkins

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Hello friends. This post is a collection of quotes from the book - The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins.

The Girl on the Train has been described as a psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people's lives.

Quotes

My mother used to tell me that I had an overactive imagination; Tom said that, too. I can't help it, I catch sight of these discarded scraps, a dirty T-shirt or a lonesome shoe, and all I can think of is the other shoe and the feet that fitted into them. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 1

Beautiful sunshine, cloudless skies, no one to play with, nothing to do. Living like this, the way I'm living at the moment, is harder in the summer when there is so much daylight, so little cover of darkness, when everyone is out and about, being flagrantly, aggressively happy. It's exhausting, and it makes you feel bad if you're not joining in. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 1

Life is not a paragraph, and death is no parenthesis. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 1

I am not the girl I used to be. I am no longer desirable, I'm off-putting in some way. It's not just that I've put on weight, or that my face is puffy from the drinking and the lack of sleep; it's as if people can see the damage written all over me, can see it in my face, the way I hold myself, the way I move. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 1

I've been up for hours; I can't sleep. I haven't slept in days. I hate this, hate insomnia more than anything, just lying there, brain going round, tick, tick, tick, tick. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 2

I've always thought that it might be fun to be Catholic, to be able to go to the confessional and unburden yourself and have someone tell you that they forgive you, to take all the sin away, wipe the slate clean. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 2

I can't do this, I can't just be a wife. I don't understand how anyone does it - there is literally nothing to do but wait. Wait for a man to come home and love you. Either that or look around for something to distract you. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 2

It's nice being out early, before the school run, before the commute gets going; the streets are empty and clean, the day full of possibility. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 3

I have never understood how people can blithely disregard the damage they do by following their hearts. Who was it said that following your heart is a good thing? It is pure egotism, a selfishness to conquer all. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 3

The thing about being barren is that you're not allowed to get away from it. Not when you're in your thirties. My friends were having children, friends of friends were having children, pregnancy and birth and first birthday parties were everywhere. I was asked about it all the time. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 7

I felt isolated in my misery. I became lonely, so I drank a bit, and then a bit more, and then I became lonelier, because no one likes being around a drunk. I lost and I drank and I drank and I lost. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 7

Let's be honest: women are still only really valued for two things - their looks and their role as mothers. I'm not beautiful, and I can't have kids, so what does that make me? Worthless. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 7

Parents don't care about anything but their children. They are the centre of the universe; they are all that really counts. Nobody else is important, no one else's suffering or joy matters, none of it is real. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 7

There was a time when I had willpower, when I could run 10k before breakfast and subsist for weeks on thirteen hundred calories a day. [...] I don't know where that strength went, I don't remember losing it. I think that over time it got chipped away, bit by bit, by life, by the living of it. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 7

Hollowness: that I understand. I'm starting to believe that there isn't anything you can do to fix it. That's what I've taken from the therapy sessions: the holes in your life are permanent. You have to grow around them, like tree roots around concrete; you mould yourself through the gaps. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 8

How much better life must have been for jealous drunks before emails and texts and mobile phones, before all this electronica and the traces it leaves. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 11

If you want someone badly enough, morals (and certainly professionalism) don't come into it. You'll do anything to have them. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 12

Well, there are therapists who believe that hypnosis can be used to recover repressed memories, but it's very controversial. I don't do it, nor do I recommend it to my patients. I'm not convinced that it helps, and in some instances I think it can be harmful. I'm sorry. I know this isn't what you want to hear. But with the mind, I think, there are no quick fixes. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 25

I'm well aware there is no job more important than that of raising a child, but the problem is that it isn't valued. Not in the sense that counts to me at the moment, which is financial. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 26

I miss being a mistress. I enjoyed it. I loved it, in fact. I never felt guilty. I pretended I did. [...] Being the other woman is a huge turn-on, there's no point denying it: you're the one he can't help but betray his wife for, even though he loves her. That's just how irresistible you are. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 26

The workings of other people's families are always so impenetrable. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 26

People you have a history with, they won't let you go, and as hard as you might try, you can't disentangle yourself, can't set yourself free. Maybe after a while you just stop trying. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 28

You're like one of those dogs, the unwanted ones that have been mistreated all their lives. You can kick them and kick them, but they'll still come back to you, cringing and wagging their tails. Begging. Hoping that this time it'll be different, that this time they'll do something right and you'll love them. You're just like that, aren't you, Rach? You're a dog. - The Girl on the Train, Chapter 38